History you can see, touch, smell and talk to.

Heritage Park features over 180 attractions and exhibits that reflect the challenges, lives and victories experienced by the generations responsible for the settlement of Western Canada. In many cases, the houses, stores and machinery at each exhibit are original. Thousands of Western Canada’s historical treasures have been generously donated and relocated to the Park.

As an accredited museum, Heritage Park is proud to preserve and share history in a way that lets visitors experience it with all five senses. Our costumed interpreters add another dimension to the immersive historical experience and bring our attractions and exhibits to life.

The Park’s attractions and exhibits span Western Canadian history from the 1860s to 1950s, and are situated in four locations around the Park:

  • 1860s Fur Trading Fort and First Nations Encampment
  • 1880s Pre-railway Settlement
  • c.1910 Prairie Railway Town
  • 1930s, '40s and '50s Gasoline Alley Museum and Heritage Town Square

Browse the Park’s exhibits below to learn more about where the Park’s vast historical offerings originated and how they came to call Heritage Park home.


 

 

Railway Sand House

Many features of the Canadian landscape and climate can have an adverse effect on rail travel. Snow, fog, rain, ice and frost can make tracks slippery and dangerous. The steep grades through the Rocky Mountains can also cause a locomotive to lose traction, especially if the locomotive is pulling a heavy load...

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Railway Turntable

The history of this turntable is subject to some debate. However, to the best of the Park's knowledge, it was built in 1907 or 1922 at the Canadian Foundry Company in Winnipeg...

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Railway Water Tower

Heritage Park's working locomotives, Nos. 2023 and 2024, each have a water tender capacity of 3,000 gallons. When in use, one of these engines will travel approximately 72 kilometres in a single day on the track at Heritage Park and use between 1,600 and 1,700 gallons of water...

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Rectory

A rectory was a luxury few parishes could afford to supply their clergymen. Early rural settlers were generally quite poor, and this was reflected in the amount of money that the settlers could afford to tithe to their church. Often, two or three settlements miles apart would band together to jointly pay for the services of a minister, meaning their minister would travel all day on Sundays to preach before his assorted congregations...

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River Forth Dining Car

The River Forth began its service in 1929 as a Solarium Parlour Observation car and was converted ten years later to a compartment lounge sleeping car. The car was modified two more times by the CPR; in 1964 it became a business car and in 1974 it was converted to a work car. The fifth and final conversion of the River Forth into a luxury dining car was completed in June of 2015 by Heritage Park.

Pulled by an antique steam engine around Heritage Park, guests can also book a lunch on select days during the Summer season and truly experience what it would have been like to travel across Canada by train in the 1900’s. Journey back in time and savour a taste of the golden age of luxury rail travel aboard the River Forth.

 

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Gasoline Alley

Gasoline Alley

Tuesday - Sunday
10:00am - 4:00pm


 

Historical Village

Historical Village

Closed for Winter Season
Open May 20, 2017

 

Haskayne Mercantile Block

Gift Shops

Open Daily
11:00am - 5:00pm
 

Railway Cafe

Railway Cafe

Open Daily
10:00am - 4:00pm
 

Selkirk Grille

Selkirk Grille

Tuesday - Sunday
Lunch & Dinner


Heritage Park Historical Village

Heritage Park Historical Village

1900 Heritage Dr. S.W.
Calgary, Alberta
T2V 2X3
Canada

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